Krakatau Tour Guidé

We deal largely in ecotourism & adventure travel, but for us adventures are not just the rugged kind. An adventure can take many forms and need involve little that is overly strenuous - to us every trip is a voyage of discovery and hence an adventure. The guiding philosophy behind each is that the trip be environmentally friendly and sustainable. This means impacting as little as possible on the peoples and places we visit, always respecting the distinctiveness and special qualities of each. The way we do it must be environmentally-friendly as well as economically and physically efficient. This means we trek, cook, camp and shows you more of the things with care and attentions.

Krakatau Résurréction

Today the only thing that remains of the original island of Krakatau is half of the Rakata volcano. Left scorched and devoid of life in 1883, Rakata regenerated at an amazing pace. Algae and ferns took hold within three years. Then grasses appeared. Over time trees took over the grasses, and within 40 years the island was covered in dense jungle. Visitors today can explore the jungle and find two-toned chunks of lava, testimonials of the magma mixing that triggered the massive explosion and tore Krakatau apart. In 1930 Krakatau proved that it wasn’t finished yet.

 

After three years of churning magma onto the seabed, a new island was born: Anak Krakatau (Child of Krakatau). Regular eruptions have raised Anak Krakatau to the lofty height of 400 metres in less than 90 years – comparable to the height of the Empire State Building. There are a few black sand beaches strewn with granite and lava rock. Areas undisturbed by volcanic activity are now covered in jungle. Birds sing and cicadas drone in the midday heat. At sunrise one is likely to be greeted by a biawak or two, cousin of the famous Komodo dragon. At dusk retiring egrets and seed-dispersing bats will cast silhouettes against the sunset. Snorkelers will feel sudden currents of hot water, bump into chunks of floating pumice and get a fascinating look at underwater lava flows.  New corals grow from the flows, temporarily providing food and shelter for marine life, waiting to be buried in the next eruption.

Above the jungle is a fascinating transition zone where pioneer species of grasses and trees establish themselves in the sterile ash and rock, laying the groundwork for future forests. Beyond the transition zone looms a barren and foreboding volcano. The trail zigzags upward through silty ash and lava flows of varying colour. Sometimes the ground will feel warm as Anak Krakatau radiates from the inside out. Then the landscape becomes an otherworldly scene: bright yellow fumaroles belching out clouds of toxic sulfuric gas.